Peace—One Domino at a Time

Peace—One Domino at a Time

A character made of boxes stands next to a row of upright dominos.

Stack a bunch of dominos close together and then flick the first in line, and the entire line will quickly collapse. That’s the image behind a political idea called the domino theory. Popularized in the latter half of the twentieth century, the theory is based on the idea that if one nation were to fall under the spell of Communism, surrounding nations were likely to topple and become Communist as well.

Though the theory has its critics, there is no doubt the principle can be applied to other areas of life. Richard Stearns, president of World Vision, invokes this idea in a positive way when he says,

“I believe that this is how God works in history. Two thousand years ago, Jesus Christ set up just 12 dominos, mentored them, and led them in his way. He empowered them with the Holy Spirit and then sent them off to go and do likewise. Two thousand years later there are more than two billion followers of Christ in the world. That’s a lot of dominos!

As Christians, we are all dominos in the chain reaction set off by Jesus. The amazing thing about dominos falling is that the chain reaction always starts small—with just one seemingly insignificant domino.”1

Many of us have spent years reading about, praying about, and seeking to follow God as he leads us toward greater peace. As in all good things that come from God’s hand, the peace he gives is meant not to be hoarded but to be shared. Today let’s thank him for ways that he has worked in our lives and ask him to make us that first domino, willing and able to spread his peace to others. What will that mean? It might involve giving a gift to an organization like World Vision or praying for someone in turmoil or starting a ministry or loving your family in practical ways. It could mean a thousand different things, depending on how the God of peace is leading you. Ask him and you will find out.

  1. Richard Stearns, “Spiritual Dominos,” World Vision News, Winter 2011, 3.

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